Shonda Rhimes on ambition, writing Grey’s Anatomy, and learning on the job. [x]

(Source: gifthetv, via nprcodeswitch)

guardian:

Courtney Moore works at Walmart. She makes $230 every two weeks. Her monthly rent is $420. 

"I am on government assistance. I am on food stamps and I have to get government housing. I should not need that if I am a Walmart employee."

Demanding higher wages and better benefits, Walmart workers protested outside Alice Walton’s home resulting in 26 arrests.

(Source: theguardian.com)

microaggressions:

My husband and I both have doctoral degrees; he earned one degree and I earned two. But written correspondence from friends, family, and community organizations is almost invariably addressed to “Dr. and Mrs.”

jessehimself:

real. really happened. in a real place, every day, in a real town with real people and families. in a real county. in a real state. full of real people,who made real decisions that ruined, everything for other, real, human beings. in a real country. our country. 

really.

(Source: howtobeterrell, via nprcodeswitch)

(Source: charlie--bird, via wirrowlikes)

(Source: sabrinacaps, via lightningleslie)

marxvx:

if i as a retail worker have to work with a dozen cameras pointed at me to deter me from stealing $10, cops should have to work with a camera pointed at them to deter them from arbitrarily maiming and killing people

(via lindsaybottos)

(Source: cordjefferson)

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School
In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassment—kicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school. In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”
Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”
Read more: Education - GOOD
truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”


She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School

In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassmentkicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school.

In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”

Read more: Education - GOOD

truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”

She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

(Source: daughtersofdig, via vickiexz)

prettyblackpastel:

lust-in-her-eyes:

pinkvelourtracksuit:

beyonce-huxtable:

nigeah:

yungmamita:

mainheaux:

OH MY GOD

THE CHOREOGRAPHY AND THE FACT THAT THE HAT STAYED ON THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE THING HAVE TOTALLY STUNNED ME

The end!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

YESSSSS

omggggggggggggg!!!!!! 

Girl at the end was everything

IDK her name, but Girl At The End also kills it in Tricia Miranda’s Banji Choreography video. Actually all of the dancers in Tricia Miranda's choreo vids go off. <3

amazing.AMAZINGGGGG

(Source: fatheaux, via vickiexz)